Thursday 3h Workshops

In-Depth Workshops – An Exploration of the Affirmative Development of Boys and Young Men of Color: Thursday, 1:15-4:15pm 

Gathering participants engage in in-depth LEARNING EXPERIENCES that are organized around the seven Core Areas of COSEBOC’s Standards and Promising Practices: Assessment, Parent/Family/Community Partnership/Curriculum and Instruction, School Environment and Climate, School Leadership, School Counseling and Guidance and School Organization. Sessions will be led by practitioners from COSEBOC School Award and Member Schools, as well as others doing promising work with and for boys and young men of color.

Thursday 3 Hour Workshops: 1:15-4:15pm. Click each link title to read the full description. 

  1. The 3 Cs Our Boys Can Conquer! Common Core, Complex Texts, and Cultural Relevancy

  2. Learning from African American Male Literary Societies of the 1800s to Cultivate the Next Generation of African American Male Readers, Writers, and Thinkers
  3. Making the Invisible Visible: Using a Racial Equity Lens to Improve Educational Outcomes for African-American Males in our Schools
  4. Engagement and Rigor for Boys of Color for Common Core ELA: How Performance Assessments Can Get Us There
  5. The Affirmative STEM Development of Communities of Color
  6. Playing with Anger: Affirming Racial Styles and Assertiveness in Boys and Young Men 
  7. SWAG On!!! Leadership Channels for Embracing and Engaging African American Boys and Young Men
  8. Color Me Community™: I Teach Who I Am
  9. “Sesa Wo Suban” - Transform Your Character
  10. Culture & Cognition Track: Culture and the Brain and The Culture of Code: The New Second Language for Boys of Color
  11. COSEBOC’s Standards and Promising Practices for Schools Educating Boys of Color
  12. Creating a Classroom Learning Community to Engage Students
  13. Cultural Competence for Educators: Advancing Development of Boys and Young Men of Color
  14. Getting Classroom Management RIGHT: Guided Discipline and Personalized Support in Secondary Schools
  15. Slavery by Another Name: Digital Storytelling

1.

The 3 Cs Our Boys Can Conquer! Common Core, Complex Texts, and Cultural Relevancy

Katuraka Alston
Katuraka Alston, New York City Department of Education Network Achievement Coach

This workshop will assist educators in navigating the teaching and learning process of the Common Core State Standards in ELA/Literacy, which rely heavily on the in-depth reading of and writing about complex texts, along with discovering meaningful ways to become or remain culturally relevant and responsive in their pedagogical approach working with boys of color. The workshop will also demonstrate that our students can be successful in a Common Core ELA/Literacy world when educators are thoughtful and deliberate about the development of curricula and units of study that are rigorous, involve high levels of critical thinking, provide access to the content through a cultural responsive approach, require targeted strategies and skills to navigate the content, and incorporate themes that span the landscape of our social experience and history.

COSEBOC Standards Core Area 3: Curriculum and Instruction

2.

Learning from African American Male Literary Societies of the 1800s to Cultivate the Next Generation of African American Male Readers, Writers, and Thinkers

Dr. Gholnecsar E. Muhammad
Assistant Professor, Georgia State University

African American male literary societies were developed throughout urban cities during the 1800s. Literary societies were more than just organizations to read, write, and discuss literature; they had wider goals of benefiting the social conditions amongst the wider society. African American males enacted four goals within membership of literary societies: (1) build intellect, (2) advance literacy development, (3) gain confidence in using language, and (4) make sense of their identities. This interactive workshop will engage participants in a critical discussion of this important yet rarely documented history, and guide them in an exploration of ways to create similar literacy groups for African American males in contemporary in and out-of-school spaces.  Participants will learn how to develop literacy groups, choose texts and link the reading of texts with writing, and develop strategies to help contemporary African American male youth meet goals similar to those from history.

COSEBOC Standards Core Area 3: Curriculum and Instruction

 3.

Making the Invisible Visible: Using a Racial Equity Lens to Improve Educational Outcomes for African-American Males in our Schools

Monica Walker
Diversity Officer for Guilford County Schools

Eric Hines
Director of Equity and Inclusion, Guilford County Schools

Deena A. Hayes Greene
GCS Board Member

Over the last decade we have been inundated with every dismal statistic there is regarding African American male students and their educational outcomes.  When this data is not filtered through a racial equity lens, it suggests to some that these young men are a problem or project to be worked on—or fixed.   Very few educators recognize or acknowledge the deficits of school systems that are insufficient to meet the needs of boys of color, and remain largely unaware of the implicit bias and structural racism that permeates the core of instructional pedagogy and classroom dynamics.  This session will provide educators and school administrators with an understanding of why race, equity and inclusion must be addressed, and will explore strategies for engaging the work, facilitating critical discussions and setting new priorities for removing the barriers.

COSEBOC Standards Core Area 3: Curriculum and Instruction
Core Area 5: School Leadership, Core Area 7: School Organization 

 4.

Engagement and Rigor for Boys of Color for Common Core ELA: How Performance Assessments Can Get Us There

Maggie Ward
Quality Performance Assessment Associate, Center for Collaborative Education

What are performance assessments and why are they so critical in creating learning experiences that are engaging, rigorous, and culturally relevant? Participants will leave with resources for implementing the Common Core in ELA, tools for increasing their level of assessment literacy and culturally relevant pedagogy, exposure to sample PARCC and SBAC items, and an understanding of the design process for creating Performance Assessments that are engaging to boys of color.  Participants will explore best practice for instruction and assessment to support and engage all students. The first half of the session will focus on shifts in ELA literacy practice arising from the Common Core and how these can be implemented using tools that help increase the level of rigor and engagement. The second half of the session will focus on the creation of rigorous and engaging performance assessments. 

COSEBOC Standards  Core Area 1: Assessment
Core Area 3: Curriculum and Instruction

 5.

The Affirmative STEM Development of Communities of Color

John Belcher
Project Leader, STEM and Boys of Color Project, TERC

In this interactive, experiential workshop, the facilitators will share with participants the process of envisioning and implementing a community‐based STEM initiative in the West Ocala neighborhood of Ocala, Florida. The West Ocala STEM Initiative is a collaborative effort of the Greater Ocala Community Development Corporation and the TERC STEM and Boys of Color project.  Additional partners include the Marion County NAACP, the Howard Academy Community Center, and local churches, amongst other stakeholders.  We will consider what it means for a community of color to build STEM capacity in ways that affirm and build upon the history/ies and cultural resources of the community.  What does capacity building look like for the residents of the community – children and adults? What does it mean for a community of color to develop a culturally resonant STEM identity? The facilitators will incorporate examples of culturally responsive STEM activities into the workshop experience.

COSEBOC Standards Core Area 3: Curriculum and Instruction

6.

 

Playing with Anger: Affirming Racial Styles and Assertiveness in Boys and Young Men 

Dr. Howard Stevenson
Professor of Education and Africana Studies, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania

This workshop will focus on reframing the deficit research analyses of and approaches toward African American boys’ styles, attitudes, and behaviors as pathological.  In contrast, the competence to see these styles as coping strengths to be acknowledged and engaged directly to affirm the boys’ knowledge and learning potential is rare. Despite the need to engage rather than avoid challenging face-to-face encounters with youth, there exists a lack of racial literacy skills among health, education, and justice authority figures to negotiate face-to-face relationships with these boys in safe and productive ways. Through the use of videotaped sessions of culturally relevant behavioral and emotional interventions, participants will receive feedback and training in how to use racial literacy in assessment of behaviors, attitudes, and styles of African American boys and young men to promote their voice and assertiveness in school classrooms and neighborhood relationships.

COSEBOC Standards Core Area 2: Parent, Family and Community Partnerships
Core Area 4: School Environment and Climate
Core Area 6: School Counseling and Guidance

7. 

 

SWAG On!!! Leadership Channels for Embracing and Engaging African American Boys and Young Men

Dr. Gwendolyn Webb-Hasan
Associate Professor, Texas A&M University

Frederick Douglass said, “It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.” The persona of 21st century African American boys and young men is amazingly complex.  Many school leaders and educators look diligently for those learners who fit the ‘mold’ of the ‘compliant’ learner.  However, what does one do when teachers say the learner does not fit that mold?  Do you know African American males; do you understand their SWAG?  This interactive workshop will provide culturally responsive, research-supported contexts to assist each of us in bringing SWAG to our practice as we develop and support teachers who in turn build strong African American males who achieve their educational destiny.  Come get your SWAG on! Learn what it really means, and take away strategies you can immediately implement in your district, building, and/or classroom.

COSEBOC Standards Core Area 3: Curriculum and Instruction
Core Area 6: School Counseling and Guidance

8.

 

Color Me Community™: I Teach Who I Am

Mary Brown
Executive Director, Life Pieces To Masterpieces

Tiffani Ross
Community Outreach and Training Manager

Life Pieces To Masterpieces shares strategies for creating an intentional environment that promotes emotional literacy for youth through the use of key components of its proven effective Human Development System. Participants will go on a journey of intra-group and introspection by utilizing Life Pieces To Masterpieces four part process (4Cs). Participants will have the opportunity to connect, create, contribute and celebrate with themselves and each other; explore how the whole of their being is brought to their role as a teacher, administrator, educator; and gain tools for identifying and creating an environment that honors the gifts and talents of the children they serve. The implementation of these key components will foster a culture of personal empowerment and an elevated quality of life for your school or organization.

COSEBOC Standards Core Area 4: School Environment and Climate
Core Area 5: School Leadership
Core Area 6: School Counseling

9.

 

“Sesa Wo Suban” - Transform Your Character

Fawaaz F. Fields
Lead Rite of Passage Facilitator
Sankofa Passages Program, COSEBOC

Ms. Khalifah Bennett
444 Partner Teacher, Edison High School, Philadelphia, PA

Bro. Brandon Deloatch
Sankofa Brother and Edison High School Student

The Sankofa Passages Program has returned to the ancient systems of ‘Rites of Passage’, and utilizes this as our core approach for reaching young men of African descent, i.e. African American, Latino and Caribbean.  ‘Rites of Passage’ consists of experiences where our young men begin their proper and true transition into manhood. The Sankofa Passages Program’s purpose is to develop our young men on the kinesthetic, affective, cognitive and most importantly the cognitive (i.e. spiritual/moral) level, so that they and we can attain the highest and truest Self.  In this session, we will explore the Stages of Rite Of Passage, the philosophy of African-Centered Rite of Passage, and the significance of this ancient approach in the transformation of our selves and the communities that we impact.  Participants will also experience how this approach is married, transferred and applied to the classroom. 

COSEBOC Standards Core Area 3: Curriculum and Instruction
Core Area 4: School Environment and Climate

10. 

Culture & Cognition Track: Culture and the Brain and The Culture of Code: The New Second Language for Boys of Color

Dr. Jamie Bracey
Director,
STEM Education, Outreach and Research, Temple University College of Engineering

This session will focus on creating STEM based learning environments that cognitively advantage boys of color.  Participants will explore the use of cultural assets combined with immersion in expert culture, or cognitive apprenticeships, as a way to create identity formation and motivation to persist in computer science - the new ‘second language’ required in the knowledge economy.

COSEBOC Standards Core Area 3: Curriculum and Instruction

11.

COSEBOC’s Standards and Promising Practices for Schools Educating Boys of Color

Dr. Deidre Farmbry
Educational Consultant and Coach, Sense-making and Strategizing for Student Success

Kimberly Zouzoua
Managing Director, Professional Services, COSEBOC

In this session, participants will explore a rationale for using the COSEBOC Standards and Promising Practices for Schools Educating Boys of Color as an assessment tool, develop a working knowledge of the content of the seven core areas of the Standards, and consider several protocols for using the Standards with colleagues in their own settings.

COSEBOC Standards -  All 7 Core Areas

12.

Creating a Classroom Learning Community to Engage Students

Kari Thierer
Organizational Director, School Reform Initiative (SRI)

Boys and young men of color need to be a part of a learning community that helps them know themselves well, build trust among their peers, and help them to recognize and reach their fullest potential. This session will focus on tools and strategies for creating an inclusive classroom community that supports students and helps increase academic achievement through collaboration and reflection. We will focus on ways to build community, engage students in critical thinking through the use of text protocols, learn tools and strategies to assist students in working to their fullest potential with a focus on quality, and learn strategies for goal setting and personal improvement.

COSEBOC Standards Core Area 3: Curriculum and Instruction
Core Area 4: School Environment and Climate

13.

Cultural Competence for Educators: Advancing Development of Boys and Young Men of Color

Brenna Isaacs, Retired Teacher [Colorado]
Trainer, NEA Minority Leadership Training Cadre

Toni Smith, Retired Teacher [Georgia]
Trainer, NEA Training Cadre on Safety, Bias,  and LGBTQ Issues

Ryans Calmont, Teacher [Florida]
Trainer, NEA Diversity Training Cadre

Timothy Ema, Teacher and Doctoral Student [Missouri]
Trainer, NEA Minority Leadership Training Cadre

Increasingly, education research and literature focus on the importance of cultural competence training for educators to help close achievement gaps, reduce dropout rates, keep youth of color from entering the “school to prison pipeline,” and increase graduation rates. This session is a 3-hour curriculum developed by the National Education Association (NEA) as a professional development tool to help educators work more effectively with diverse groups of students. It challenges educators, including educators of color, to critically examine and strengthen their own teaching practices in order to ensure that every student, from every culture that we encounter in our schools, has the opportunity to be successful and has the benefit of a truly great public education. The cultural competence workshop has four learning objectives:

  • Deepen our own cultural self-awareness
  • Increase understanding about the link between cultural self-awareness and cultural competence
  • Identify culturally responsive teaching practices
  • Share strategies for promoting culturally responsive instruction

COSEBOC Standards Core Area 3: Curriculum and Instruction
Core Area 5: School Leadership

14. 

Getting Classroom Management RIGHT: Guided Discipline and Personalized Support in Secondary Schools

Mary James Edwards
Senior Consultant, Educators for Social Responsibility (ESR)

Participants in this highly interactive workshop will learn to use Guided Discipline and personalized student support, enabling them to:

  • reduce student-teacher conflicts by developing tools, protocols, and effective “teacher talk” that help defuse student frustration and confrontational behaviors
  • reduce disciplinary referrals by taking a more proactive role (teacher as first responder) in handling behavioral and academic difficulties students experience in the classroom
  • work more effectively with reluctant, resistant, unmotivated, and failing students
  • Build their comfort and skills to model, teach, practice, and assess SEL competencies in the classroom

Participants will leave with strategies that can be implemented immediately.

COSEBOC Standards Core Area 3: Curriculum and Instruction
Core Area 4: School Environment and Climate
Core Area 7: School Organization

15.

Slavery by Another Name: Digital Storytelling

Felicia Pride
Educational Consultant

Slavery by Another Name is a documentary film produced by Twin Cities Public Television that challenges our country’s most cherished assumption: that slavery in this country ended with the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863. The film documents how after the Civil War, repressive labor practices and laws pulled thousands of African Americans in the South back into new forms of slavery that lasted well into the 20th century.  As a way to connect this history with the contemporary experiences of African American male students, the Open Society Campaign for Black Male Achievement has provided funding support for ‘Slavery by Another Name: Digital Storytelling’.

This project further educates teachers about this little-known history, and helps them engage African American male students through customized curricula and a media-making component that will ultimately provide a meaningful platform from which students can engage in civil discourse. This session will pilot a professional development workshop to support educators in the use of these materials, the teaching of this history, and the facilitation of a digital storytelling activity. 

COSEBOC Standards Core Area 3: Curriculum and Instruction